CURVE

Collaborative University Research & Visualization Environment

Tag: digital scholarship

Larger-scale Photogrammetry at CURVE

During the spring semester, I acquired a clay whisky jug from the Phoenix Lab, which contains artifacts recovered from the excavation of MARTA lines in the 1970s. Dr. Robin Wharton has worked with students in her multimodel composition course to scan and model objects from the collection, and discussed the process in Atlanta Studies. In this case, the purpose was to experiment with photogrammetry for larger objects, testing the equipment and software that the Library has acquired. The jug is roughly 8 inches high and 6 inches in diameter, with a circumference of 19 inches.

image of whisky jug

Whisky Jug

The jug wears the story of its life. The outside is worn and pitted, and carries a few kiln drips, where the kiln bricks melted and dripped on to the jug as it was fired. These drips show as dark splotches on the outside of the jug. Stamped on the top shoulder of the jug are two names: T.W. Cofield and E.C. Brown.

Whisky jug with stamp showing T.W. Cofield and E.C. Brown

Stamp showing T.W. Cofield and E.C. Brown

To capture the entire jug in detail, I took images of the jug at 15 degree intervals on three elevations. I used Agisoft Photoscan to assembled the images into point clouds, meshes, and then textured models. I then pinned the three partial sections together, which resulted in a full model of the jug.

In the finished 3D model, you can manipulate the jug to see its details and textures, including the stamped inscription with the two potters’ names.

Click here to see the Whisky Jug on SketchFab

Thomas William Cofield and Edward C. Brown were cousins who lived in the Howell’s Mills area in northwest Atlanta, near present-day Buckhead. Edward’s father was Bowling P. Brown, a potter. His grandfather was Bowling Brown, also a potter, who had moved the family from Jugtown (an unofficial name) on borders of Upson and Pike counties.

Bowling’s daughter (and B.P.’s sister) Mary Jane Brown married Thomas B. Cofield from North Carolina while they lived in Jugtown. Their son, Thomas W. Cofield, became a potter and worked alongside his cousin, E.C. Brown, to produce jugs for Atlanta’s businesses from the 1880s through the 1910s. [Note 1]

In his history of Georgia’s folk pottery, John A. Burrison suggests that Thomas and Edward worked together no later than 1911, after which Edward “became a gardener (and later foreman) at Grant Park.” Based on this suggestion, we can infer that the whisky jug is at least 106 years old. The jug is in remarkable shape for its age, but I still wouldn’t recommend drinking from it.

 

Notes

  1. John A. Burrison, Brothers in Clay: The Story of Georgia Folk Pottery (Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2008), pp. 71, 168, 191, 195, 199.
  2. Ibid., p. 195.

[This article has been cross-posted from swroberts.ca]

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A project with heart: Human anatomy students create 3D models

Students in Dr. Carmen Eilertson’s Biology 4687/6687 Surgical Anatomy course have been busy this semester creating detailed 3D models of human organs from their cadaveric dissections. Cadaveric dissection is a critical part of medical education, and under the direction of “Dr. E,” even undergraduate biology students at Georgia State gain exposure to human anatomical specimens for learning and research.

Here, undergraduate student Kenya Thrasher scans a human heart using a NextEngine laser scanner in CURVE’s 3D Modeling Lab:

CURVE’s 3D scanners enhance research and learning by enabling students and instructors to convert physical artifacts into 3D digital objects for up-close study and analysis and for sharing with other students and the broader research community. The scanning hardware and software can be used to create virtual models of objects for learning and research across disciplines.

Once their high-resolution scans are complete, Dr. E’s students will be able to zoom in and analyze each organ’s features from multiple angles. As part of this assignment, students will also label the features on each digital model.

Thanks to the Student Innovation Fellows Program and Center for Excellence in Teaching in Learning at Georgia State for their support of this innovative project.

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